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Turning Points Of Second World War Midway El Alamein Stalingrad DVD MP4 USB

Turning Points Of Second World War Midway El Alamein Stalingrad DVD MP4 USB
Turning Points Of Second World War Midway El Alamein Stalingrad DVD MP4 USB
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An Investigation Into The Three Most Momentous Battles Of World War Two - The Battle Of Midway (June 4-7, 1942) Between American And Japanese Forces In The Pacific, The Battle Of El Alamein (First Battle Of El Alamein: July 1-27, 1942, Second Battle Of El Alamein: October 23 - November 4, 1942) Between British And The German Forces In North Africa, And The Battle Of Stalingrad (August 23, 1942 - February 2, 1943) Between Soviet And German Forces On The Volga River - Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! (Color, 1990, 59 Minutes.) #TurningPointsOfTheSecondWorldWar #TurningPointsOfWorldWarII #TurningPointsOfWWII #BattleOfMidway #BattleOfElAlamein #FirstBattleOfElAlamein #SecondBattleOfElAlamein #BattleOfStalingrad #PacificWar #AsiaPacificWar #PacificOceanTheatreOfWWII #PacificOceanTheaterOfWWII #SouthWestPacificTheatreOfWWII #SouthWestPacificTheaterOfWWII #AsiaticPacificTheater #WesternDesertCampaign #NorthAfricanCampaign #EuropeanTheatreOfWWII #SecondEuropeanWar #EuropeanCivilWar #EuropeanTheaterOfWWII #WesternFrontWWII #WorldWarII #WorldWar2 #WWII #WW2 #WorldWarTwo #WorldWar2 #SecondWorldWar #DVD #VideoDownload #MP4 #USBFlashDrive


The Battle Of Midway was a decisive naval battle in the Pacific Theater of World War II which occurred during June 4-7, 1942, only six months after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and one month after the historic Battle of the Coral Sea. The United States Navy under Admirals Chester Nimitz, Frank Jack Fletcher, and Raymond A. Spruance defeated an attacking fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy under Admirals Isoroku Yamamoto, Chuichi Nagumo, and Nobutake Kondo near Midway Atoll, inflicting devastating damage on the Japanese fleet that proved irreparable. Military historian John Keegan called it "the most stunning and decisive blow in the history of naval warfare.". The Japanese operation, like the earlier attack on Pearl Harbor, sought to eliminate the United States as a strategic power in the Pacific, thereby giving Japan a free hand in establishing its Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The Japanese hoped another demoralizing defeat would force the U.S. to capitulate in the Pacific War and thus ensure Japanese dominance in the Pacific. Luring the American aircraft carriers into a trap and occupying Midway was part of an overall "barrier" strategy to extend Japan's defensive perimeter, in response to the Doolittle air raid on Tokyo. This operation was also considered preparatory for further attacks against Fiji, Samoa, and Hawaii itself. The plan was handicapped by faulty Japanese assumptions of the American reaction and poor initial dispositions. Most significantly, American cryptographers at Station HYPO in Hawaii were able to determine from decryptions of the Japanese JN-25 naval communications cypher the date and location of the planned attack, enabling the forewarned U.S. Navy to prepare its own ambush. There were seven aircraft carriers involved in the battle, and all four of Japan's large fleet carriers - Akagi, Kaga, Soryu and Hiryu, part of the six-carrier force that had attacked Pearl Harbor six months earlier - and the heavy cruiser Mikuma were sunk, while the U.S. lost only the carrier USS Yorktown and the destroyer USS Hammann. After Midway and the exhausting attrition of the Solomon Islands campaign, Japan's capacity to replace its losses in materiel (particularly aircraft carriers) and men (especially well-trained pilots and maintenance crewmen) rapidly became insufficient to cope with mounting casualties, while the United States' massive industrial and training capabilities made losses far easier to replace. The Battle of Midway, along with the Guadalcanal Campaign, is widely considered the turning point in the Pacific War.

The First Battle Of El Alamein (July 1-27, 1942) was a battle of the Western Desert Campaign of the Second World War, fought in Egypt between Axis forces (Germany and Italy) of the Panzer Army Africa (Panzerarmee Afrika) (which included the Afrika Korps under Field Marshal (Generalfeldmarschall) Erwin Rommel) and Allied (British Imperial and Commonwealth) forces (Britain, British India, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand) of the Eighth Army (General Claude Auchinleck). The British prevented a second advance by the Axis forces into Egypt. Axis positions near El Alamein, only 66 mi (106 km) from Alexandria, were dangerously close to the ports and cities of Egypt, the base facilities of the Commonwealth forces and the Suez Canal. However, the Axis forces were too far from their base at Tripoli in Libya to remain at El Alamein indefinitely, which led both sides to accumulate supplies for more offensives, against the constraints of time and distance.

The Second Battle Of El Alamein (October 23 - November 11, 1942) was a battle of the Second World War that took place near the Egyptian railway halt of El Alamein. The First Battle of El Alamein and the Battle of Alam el Halfa had prevented the Axis from advancing further into Egypt. In August 1942, General Claude Auchinleck had been relieved as Commander-in-Chief Middle East Command and his successor, Lieutenant-General William Gott was killed on his way to replace him as commander of the Eighth Army. Lieutenant-General Bernard Montgomery was appointed and led the Eighth Army offensive. The Allied victory was the beginning of the end of the Western Desert Campaign, eliminating the Axis threat to Egypt, the Suez Canal and the Middle Eastern and Persian oil fields. The battle revived the morale of the Allies, being the first big success against the Axis since Operation Crusader in late 1941. The battle coincided with the Allied invasion of French North Africa in Operation Torch on 8 November, the Battle of Stalingrad and the Guadalcanal Campaign.

In the Battle Of Stalingrad (August 23, 1942 - February 2, 1943), Germany and its allies fought the Soviet Union for control of the city of Stalingrad (now Volgograd) in Southern Russia. Marked by fierce close-quarters combat and direct assaults on civilians in air raids, it is one of the bloodiest battles in the history of warfare, with an estimated 2 million total casualties. After their defeat at Stalingrad, the German High Command had to withdraw considerable military forces from other theaters of war to replace their losses. The German offensive to capture Stalingrad, a major industrial and transport hub on the Volga River that ensured Soviet access to the Caucasus oil wells, began in August 1942, using the 6th Army and elements of the 4th Panzer Army. The attack was supported by intense Luftwaffe bombing that reduced much of the city to rubble. The battle degenerated into house-to-house fighting, as both sides poured reinforcements into the city. By mid-November, the Germans had pushed the Soviet defenders back at great cost into narrow zones along the west bank of the river. On 19 November, the Red Army launched Operation Uranus, a two-pronged attack targeting the weaker Romanian and Hungarian armies protecting the 6th Army's flanks. The Axis flanks were overrun and the 6th Army was cut off and surrounded in the Stalingrad area. Adolf Hitler was determined to hold the city at all costs and forbade the 6th Army from attempting a breakout; instead, attempts were made to supply it by air and to break the encirclement from the outside. Heavy fighting continued for another two months. At the beginning of February 1943, the Axis forces in Stalingrad, having exhausted their ammunition and food, surrendered after five months, one week and three days of fighting.