* EarthStation1.com 1996-2021: Join us as we celebrate 25 years online!

The Battle Of Britain & The Blitz Documentaries Set DVD, MP4, USB

The Battle Of Britain & The Blitz Documentaries Set DVD, MP4, USB
The Battle Of Britain & The Blitz Documentaries Set DVD, MP4, USB
Item# battle-of-britain-dvd-dual-layer-wwii-documentaries
List Price: $19.96
Your Sale Price: $9.49
Choose DVD, Video Download or USB Flash Drive Version: 

9.49 USD. Free Shipping Worldwide!

Britain's Finest Hour Is Found In The Skies Above Her As Fascism Rained Bombs Upon Her - 5 Golden Age TV Documentaries Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! #BattleOfBritain #TheFew #AirWarfareOfWWII #AirCombat #AirBattles #RAFFighterCommand #RAFFighterCommandHistory #HistoryOfRAFFighterCommand #RAF #RAFHistory #Luftwaffe #HermannGoering #HughDowding #AirMarshalDowding #FabianStrategy #TheBlitz #MilitaryHistoryOfTheUKDuringWWII #StrategicBombingDuringWWII #AerialBombardment #AirStrikes #AerialWarfare #London #LondonHistory #AirRaids #AerialBombing #StrategicBombing #WWIIAviation #AviationInWorldWarII #AviationInWWII #AirWarfareOfWorldWarII #OperationEagleAttack #OperationSeaLion #EuropeanTheaterOfWWII #EuropeanTheatreOfWWII #SecondEuropeanWar #EuropeanCivilWar #WorldWarII #WWII #WW2 #WorldWarTwo #WorldWar2 #SecondWorldWar #DVD #VideoDownload #MP4 #USBFlashDrive

Contents:

MEN IN CRISIS: CHURCHILL VS. GOERING (Black/White, 21 Minutes.)
Edmund O'Brien narrates an installment of the definitive "opponent vs opponent" documentary series which explores the decisive confrontation between the chief of the German Luftwaffe, Air Marshal Herman Goering, and the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill for air supremacy over England and the crushing of British defenses in preparation for a thwarted invasion.

WINSTON CHURCHILL: THE VALIANT YEARS - THE RAVENS REMAIN (Black/White, 22 Minutes.)
Narrated by Richard Burton, this installment of the 1960 television series based on Winston Churchill's book "The Second World War" chronicles the Prime Minister's involvement in and actions and reactions regarding the unfolding and aftermath of The Battle Of Britain.

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN (Black/White, 45 Minutes.)
CBS documentary narrated by Richard Basehart that serves to encapsulate the events the lead to and included what was then the world's greatest air battle in history into a form that is easily accessible and accurate.

BATTLELINE - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN (Black/White, 24 Minutes.)
An episode from the epic 1963 documentary series featuring an account from a soldier from each side of a particular battle, in this case from the Battle of Britain.

AIR POWER - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN (Black/White, 24 Minutes.)
Walter Cronkite narrates as this venerable epic World War II documentary series covers this pivotal battle with precision and insight.


The Battle of Britain (German: Die Luftschlacht Um England, "The Air Battle For England") was a military campaign of the Second World War, in which the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the Fleet Air Arm (FAA) of the Royal Navy defended the United Kingdom (UK) against large-scale attacks by Nazi Germany's air force, the Luftwaffe. It has been described as the first major military campaign fought entirely by air forces. The British officially recognise the battle's duration as being from 10 July until 31 October 1940, which overlaps the period of large-scale night attacks known as the Blitz, that lasted from 7 September 1940 to 11 May 1941. German historians do not accept this subdivision and regard the battle as a single campaign lasting from July 1940 to June 1941, including the Blitz. The primary objective of the German forces was to compel Britain to agree to a negotiated peace settlement. In July 1940, the air and sea blockade began, with the Luftwaffe mainly targeting coastal-shipping convoys, as well as ports and shipping centres such as Portsmouth. On 1 August, the Luftwaffe was directed to achieve air superiority over the RAF, with the aim of incapacitating RAF Fighter Command; 12 days later, it shifted the attacks to RAF airfields and infrastructure. As the battle progressed, the Luftwaffe also targeted factories involved in aircraft production and strategic infrastructure. Eventually, it employed terror bombing on areas of political significance and on civilians. The Germans had rapidly overwhelmed France and the Low Countries, leaving Britain to face the threat of invasion by sea. The German high command recognised the logistic difficulties of a seaborne attack, particularly while the Royal Navy controlled the English Channel and the North Sea. On 16 July, Hitler ordered the preparation of Operation Sea Lion as a potential amphibious and airborne assault on Britain, to follow once the Luftwaffe had air superiority over the Channel. In September, RAF Bomber Command night raids disrupted the German preparation of converted barges, and the Luftwaffe's failure to overwhelm the RAF forced Hitler to postpone and eventually cancel Operation Sea Lion. The Luftwaffe proved unable to sustain daylight raids, but their continued night-bombing operations on Britain became known as the Blitz. Historian Stephen Bungay cited Germany's failure to destroy Britain's air defences to force an armistice (or even an outright surrender) as the first major German defeat in World War II and a crucial turning point in the conflict. The Battle of Britain takes its name from the speech given by Prime Minister Winston Churchill to the House of Commons on 18 June: "What General Weygand called the 'Battle of France' is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin."

The Blitz was a German bombing campaign against the United Kingdom in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War. The term was first used by the British press and originated from the term "Blitzkrieg", the German word for 'lightning war'. The Germans conducted mass air attacks against industrial targets, towns, and cities, beginning with raids on London towards the end of the Battle of Britain in 1940 (a battle for daylight air superiority between the Luftwaffe and the Royal Air Force over the United Kingdom). By September 1940, the Luftwaffe had lost the Battle of Britain and the German air fleets (Luftflotten) were ordered to attack London, to draw RAF Fighter Command into a battle of annihilation. Adolf Hitler and Reichsmarschall Hermann Goring, commander-in-chief of the Luftwaffe, ordered the new policy on 6 September 1940. From 7 September 1940, London was systematically bombed by the Luftwaffe for 56 of the following 57 days and nights. Most notable was a large daylight attack against London on 15 September. The Luftwaffe gradually decreased daylight operations in favour of night attacks to evade attacks by the RAF, and the Blitz became a night bombing campaign after October 1940. The Luftwaffe attacked the main Atlantic seaport of Liverpool in the Liverpool Blitz. The North Sea port of Hull, a convenient and easily found target or secondary target for bombers unable to locate their primary targets, suffered the Hull Blitz. The port cities of Bristol, Cardiff, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Southampton, Swansea, Belfast, and Glasgow were also bombed, as were the industrial centres of Birmingham, Coventry, Manchester and Sheffield. More than 40,000 civilians were killed by Luftwaffe bombing during the war, almost half of them in the capital, where more than a million houses were destroyed or damaged. In early July 1940, the German High Command began planning Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union. Bombing failed to demoralise the British into surrender or do much damage to the war economy; eight months of bombing never seriously hampered British war production, which continued to increase. The greatest effect was to force the British to disperse the production of aircraft and spare parts. British wartime studies concluded that cities generally took 10 to 15 days to recover when hit severely, but exceptions like Birmingham took three months. The German air offensive failed because the Luftwaffe High Command (Oberkommando der Luftwaffe, OKL) did not develop a methodical strategy for destroying British war industry. Poor intelligence about British industry and economic efficiency led to OKL concentrating on tactics rather than strategy. The bombing effort was diluted by attacks against several sets of industries instead of constant pressure on the most vital.