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Ulysses S. Grant & The Battle Of The Wilderness DVD MP4 USB Drive

Ulysses S. Grant & The Battle Of The Wilderness DVD MP4 USB Drive
Ulysses S. Grant & The Battle Of The Wilderness DVD MP4 USB Drive
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Ulysses S. Grant, Future Commanding General Of The Army Of The Union In The American Civil War General And Future 18th President Of The United States, And The Battle Of The Wilderness, Fought May 5-7, 1864 And The Bloody First Battle Between Lt. Gen. Grant And Gen. Robert E. Lee During Grant's 1864 Virginia Overland Campaign Against The Confederate Army Of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War, Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! (Color, 1993, 48 Minutes.) #UlyssesSGrant #USGrant #UnconditionalSurrenderGrant #PresidentsOfTheUS #POTUS #POTUSHistory #AmericanPresidents #CommandingGeneralOfTheUSArmy #UnionArmy #BattleOfTheWilderness #WildernessCampaign #VirginiaOverlandCampaign #RobertELee #ArmyOfNorthernVirginia #AmericanCivilWar #AmericanHistory #HistoryOfTheUS #WarBetweenTheStates #USMilitaryAcademy #WestPoint #MexicanAmericanWar #MexicanWar #BattleOfShiloh #VicksburgCampaign #ChattanoogaCampaign #SiegeOfPetersburg #RichmondPetersburgCampaign #BattleOfAppomattoxCourtHouse #UnconditionalSurrender #DVD #VideoDownload #MP4 #USBFlashDrive

The Battle of the Wilderness, fought May 5-7, 1864, was the first battle of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's and General George G. Meade's 1864 Virginia Overland Campaign against Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War. Both armies suffered heavy casualties, around 5,000 men killed in total, a harbinger of a bloody war of attrition by Grant against Lee's army and, eventually, the Confederate capital, Richmond, Virginia. The battle was tactically inconclusive, as Grant disengaged and continued his offensive. Grant attempted to move quickly through the dense underbrush of the Wilderness of Spotsylvania, but Lee launched two of his corps on parallel roads to intercept him. On the morning of May 5, the Union V Corps under Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren attacked the Confederate Second Corps, commanded by Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell, on the Orange Turnpike. That afternoon the Third Corps, commanded by Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill, encountered Brig. Gen. George W. Getty's division (VI Corps) and Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock's II Corps on the Orange Plank Road. Fighting until dark was fierce but inconclusive as both sides attempted to maneuver in the dense woods. At dawn on May 6, Hancock attacked along the Plank Road, driving Hill's Corps back in confusion, but the First Corps of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet arrived in time to prevent the collapse of the Confederate right flank. Longstreet followed up with a surprise flanking attack from an unfinished railroad bed that drove Hancock's men back to the Brock Road, but the momentum was lost when Longstreet was wounded by his own men. An evening attack by Brig. Gen. John B. Gordon against the Union right flank caused consternation at Union headquarters, but the lines stabilized and fighting ceased. On May 7, Grant disengaged and moved to the southeast, intending to leave the Wilderness to interpose his army between Lee and Richmond, leading to the bloody Battle of Spotsylvania Court House.

Ulysses S. Grant, American U.S. Civil War General, 18th President of the United States (1822-1885) was born Hiram Ulysses Grant in Point Pleasant, Ohio.Grant served as Commanding General of the Army and then the President of the United States, the highest positions in the military and the government of the United States. A prominent United States Army general during the American Civil War, Grant led the Union Army to victory over the Confederacy with the supervision of Abraham Lincoln. As the 18th President of the United States (1869-77) Grant led the Republicans in their efforts to remove the vestiges of Confederate nationalism and slavery during Reconstruction. Grant was born and raised in Ohio by Methodist parents whose lineage in the new world went back several generations. As a youth he often worked in his father's tannery and showed an early talent for riding, taming and managing horses. After graduating from West Point in 1843 Grant served with distinction in the Mexican-American War. Upon his return he married Julia Dent, and together they had four children. Grant retired from the army in 1854 and struggled financially in civilian life. When the Civil War began in 1861 he rejoined the army and quickly rose through the ranks. During the war, he earned the nickname "Unconditional Surrender" Grant . As a general he took control of Kentucky, most of Tennessee, won major battles at Shiloh and seized Vicksburg, gaining control of the Mississippi River and dividing the Confederacy. These victories, combined with those in the Chattanooga Campaign, persuaded Abraham Lincoln that Grant was the general best suited to lead the combined Union armies. Grant was promoted to Lieutenant General, a rank previously reserved for George Washington, in March 1864. He confronted Robert E. Lee, trapping his army in their defense of Richmond, while coordinating a series of campaigns in other theaters. In April 1865 Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, effectively ending the war. Historians have hailed Grant's military genius, and his strategies are featured in military history textbooks. After Lincoln's assassination, Grant became increasingly disillusioned by President Andrew Johnson's approach to Reconstruction, and drifted toward the "Radical" Republicans. Elected president in 1868, the youngest man in the office to that date, Grant stabilized the post-war national economy, created the Department of Justice, used the military to enforce laws in the former Confederacy and prosecuted the Ku Klux Klan. Grant strengthened the Republican Party in the South and signed three civil rights acts into law. He appointed African-Americans and Jewish-Americans to prominent federal offices. In 1871 he created the first Civil Service Commission. The Democrats and Liberal Republicans united behind Grant's opponent in the presidential election of 1872, but Grant was re-elected by a large margin. Generally regarded as personally honest, he nonetheless faced accusations of corruption within his administration. Grant's Peace Policy with Native Americans was a bold departure for its time. In foreign policy, Grant sought to increase trade and influence while remaining at peace with the world. With Secretary of State Hamilton Fish, he successfully resolved the Alabama claims with Great Britain (a series of demands for damages sought by the government of the United States from the United Kingdom in 1869 for the attacks upon Union merchant ships by Confederate Navy commerce raiders built in British shipyards during the American Civil War, focused chiefly on damages by the most famous of these raiders, the CSS Alabama, which took more than sixty prizes before she was sunk off the French coast in 1864). Grant and Fish negotiated a peaceful resolution with Spain over the Virginius Affair. Congress rejected Grant's initiative to annex the Dominican Republic, creating a rift among Republicans. In national affairs, Grant's administration implemented a gold standard and sought to strengthen the dollar. Grant's immediate response to the Panic of 1873 failed to halt a severe industrial depression that produced high unemployment, deflation, and bankruptcies. When he left office in 1877, Grant embarked on a two-and-a-half-year world tour that captured favorable global attention for him and the United States. In 1880, Grant was unsuccessful in obtaining the Republican presidential nomination for a third term. Facing severe investment reversals and dying of throat cancer, he wrote his memoirs, which proved to be a major critical and financial success. His death in 1885 prompted an outpouring in support of national unity. Historical assessments of Grant's legacy have varied considerably over the years. Although Grant's presidency has popularly been criticized for its Gilded Age scandals, modern scholarship regards him as an embattled president who performed a difficult job during Reconstruction. Although early rankings of Presidents rated his administration among the worst, modern appreciation for Grant's support of civil rights and diverse federal appointments has greatly improved his historical reputation.