* EarthStation1.com 1996-2022: Join Us As We Celebrate 26 Years Online!

The Machine That Changed The World: The Computer DVD MP4 Download

The Machine That Changed The World: The Computer DVD MP4 Download
The Machine That Changed The World: The Computer DVD MP4 Download
Item# the-machine-that-changed-the-world-the-computer-dvd-mp4-downloa4
List Price: $29.96
Your Sale Price: $18.49
Choose DVD or Download Version: 

18.49 USD. Free Shipping Worldwide!

The History Of The Computer And All That Goes In And Out Of It, From Its Earliest 19th Century Ancestors To The Dawn Of The Internet, Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS In An Archival Quality 3 Disc All Regions Format DVD Set Or MP4 Video Download! (Color, 1992, 5 Episodes Of 58 Minutes Each.) #TheMachineThatChangedTheWorld #Computers #DigitalComputers #AnalogComputers #HumanComputers #ComputingMachines #UniversalComputingMachines #ComputerTerminals #ComputerScience #CharlesBabbage #DifferenceEngine #AnalyticalEngine #AdaLovelace #ComputerPioneers #JosephMarieJacquard #JacquardMachine #ProgrammableLoom #PunchedCards #HumanCalculators #Calculators #MechanicalCalculators #ElectronicCalculators #TelephoneSwitches #VacuumTubes #PunchedTape #PunchedFilm #GunFiringTables #ENIAC #JohnMauchly #JPresperEckert #JohnVonNeumann #AlanTuring #ComputerScientists #Cryptanalysis #ArtificialIntelligence #AI #EnigmaCode #BletchleyPark #CodeBreakers #CipherBreakers #SecretWar #SecretWarWWII #SecretIntelligence #WorldWarII #WWII #WW2 #WorldWarTwo #WorldWar2 #SecondWorldWar #Codebreaking #Cryptology #Codes #Cyphers #UltraSecret #EnigmaMachine #SecondEuropeanWar #EuropeanCivilWar #HughWhitemore #BreakingTheCode #DerekJacobi #TuringsProof #TuringMachine #TuringTest #PaulCeruzzi, #HistoryOfComputing #HistoryOfTheComputer #SmithsonianInstitution #DoronSwade #LondonScienceMuseum #KonradZuse #Z3 #KayMauchlyAntonelli #HermanGoldstine #MauriceWilkes #EDSAC #CambridgeUniversity #DonaldMichi #Codebreakers #TheTuringInstitute #UNIVAC #MorrisHansen #EckertMauchlyComputerCorporation #USCensusBureau #JLyons #JLyonsAndCo #LyonsElectronicOffice #Blacklisting #SecondRedScare #RedScare #HarryLStraus #AmericanTotalisatorCompany #RemingtonRand #BusinessMachineManufacturers #JamesRand #1952USPresidentialElection #IBM #ThomasJWatson Sr #ThomasJWatsonJr #BinaryCode #Fortran #Cobol #Automation #ERMA #CheckCashing #Transistors #TyrannyOfNumbers #JackKilby #TexasInstruments #RobertNoyce #FairchildSemiconductor #MissileTechnology #IntegratedCircuit #SiliconValley #ApolloLunarModule #LEM #LM #LunarLander #StephenWozniak #SteveJobs #TedWithington #JohnPinketon #JamesBirkenstock #JeanSammet #ProgrammingLanguages #DickDavis #BankOfAmerica #BoA #GordonMoore #IntelCorporation #AppleComputer #TheComputerSketchpad #InteractiveComputers #IvanSutherland #DouglasEngelbart #XeroxPARC #PaloAltoResearchCenter #ComputerMouse #WordProcessors #Microprocessors #Altair8800 #AppleI #IBMPersonalComputer #PCs #PersonalComputers #AppleMacintosh #DesktopComputers #GraphicalUserInterface #GUI #VideoGames #BillGates #Microsoft #Handicapped #VirtualReality #MitchellKapor #LotusSoftware #TheodorHolmNelson #DouglasEnglbart #ComputerEngineers #Xerox #XeroxCorporation #LarryTesler #AlanKay #RobertTaylor #TedHolt #MikeMarkkula #AngelInvestors #LeeFelsenstein #HomebrewComputerClub #ChrisPeters, #MicrosoftSupremos #AnneMyer #CenterForAppliedSpecialTechnology #MatthewHuggins #HenryFuchs #UNC #UNCChapelHill #JaneRichards #FrederickPBrooks JeromeWiesner #MIT #MITResearchLaboratoryOfElectronics #MarvinMinksy #JohnMcCarthy #MITComputerScienceAndArtificialIntelligenceLaboratory #JamesRobertSlagle #Chess #ThinkingMachines #MachineLearning #TerryWinograd #SHRDLU #Microworlds #Nicrotasks #EdwardFeigenbaum #SpectrographicAnalysis #Medicine #Science #FacialRecognition #ArtificialNeuralNetworking #NeuralNetworking #ArtificialNeuralNetworks #NeuralNetworks #ArtificialHumanSpeech #Robots #HubertDreyfus #UniversityOfCaliforniaBerkeley #StanfordUniversity #OliverGSelfridge #LincolnLaboratories #ClaudeShannon #FatherOfInformationTheory" #HansMoravec #RoboticsInstitute #CarnegieMellonUniversity #DougLenat #UniversityOfTexasAustin #DeanOmperleau #GlobalInterconnectivity #Internet #ComputersNetworks #Privacy #BigData #Digitation #ArtPreservation #SistineChapel #ElectronicBulletinBoards #Email #FinancialTrading #StockMarkets #ScientificDiscoveries #InternationalCommunities #OnlineCommunities #ComputerErrors #ComputerBugs #ComputerSurveillance #ComputerTechnologySocieties #Singapore #MassTransit #SocialMovements #Activism #Protests #MedicalSoftware #InternationalCommunications #Telephony #RobertLucky #ATAndT #ATAndTBellLabs #BellLabs #GeorgeHayter #LondonStockExchange #BenBagdikian #ArthurMiller #HarvardLawSchool #OnTechnology #DVD #MP4 #VideoDownload


Contents:

VOLUME ONE:

Episode 1: Giant Brains: Charles Babbage's Difference Engine and Analytical Engine; Ada Lovelace, computer pioneer involving Babbage's Analytical Engine, daughter of Lord Byron; Joseph Marie Jacquard's Jacquard Machine programmable loom and its Punched Cards; Human Calculators and their Calculators (mechanical and electronic); Electronic Computers used in World War II; calculating using electro-mechanical Telephone Switches versus Vacuum Tubes; decimal to binary conversion; Punched Tape (Punched Film); American Gun Firing Tables calculations during World War II; ENIAC, the first programmable, electronic, general-purpose digital computer developed to produce Gun Firing Tables for the U.S. during Wordl War II; John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, inventors of ENIAC; John von Neumann, American mathematician who laid the groundwork for the modern computer based on what was learned from ENIAC; Alan Turing, English mathematician, computer scientist, logician and cryptanalyst, widely considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence; the German Enigma Code and the British/Allied Project Ultra at Bletchley Park to successfully decypher it; the Hugh Whitemore play "Breaking The Code" starring Derek Jacobi that dramatizes Alan Turing's words and writings; Turing's Proof, the Turing Machine and the Turing Test; more (With Paul Ceruzzi, Historian Of Computing, Smithsonian Institution; Doron Swade, London Science Museum; Konrad Zuse, inventor of the world's first programmable, fully automatic compuer, the Z3; Kay Mauchly Antonelli, American Human Computer for Gun Firing Tables during World War II; Herman Goldstine, lead developer of ENIAC; J. Presper Eckert, Co-Inventor of ENIAC; Maurice Wilkes, British computer scientist who designed and helped build the Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator (EDSAC), Cambridge University; Donald Michie, Codebreaker of Bletchley Park, member of The Turing Institute, Glasgow)

Episode 2: Inventing The Future: The saga of turning the U.S. military's ENIAC into the commercially viable UNIVAC for use in government, science and industry; Punched Card technology adopted for use in UNIVAC; Morris Hansen's commission to the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation for the U.S. Census Bureau for a UNIVAC machine, the successor of ENIAC; British food manufacturer J. Lyons and Co.'s LEO (Lyons Electronic Office) computers, used to track its inventory, then sold on the open market; John Mauchly's unmerited blacklisting during Second Red Scare and its resultant loss of Eckert-Mauchly's government contracts; the investment of Harry L. Straus, founder of the American Totalisator Company which calculated odds and payouts at race tracks, in the Eckert-Mauchly company, and the company's subsequent divestmetn after Straus' death; the sale of Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation to Remington Rand, an early and large American business machine manufacturer. on February 1, 1950; James Rand Jr.'s stewardship of his new computer division; the installation of UNIVAC in the U.S. Census Bureau under the Remington Rand name; the accurate prediction by UNIVAC of a landslide victory for Eisenhower in the 1952 Presidential election, with just some 5% of the votes tabulated - contradicting the Gallup Poll's prediction of Eisenhower winning the popular vote 51-49 in a close contest, causing CBS News executives, who were using UNIVAC in live TV coverage of the election, to order that UNIVAC's calculations not be announced as they were thought to be wrong; IBM's reaction fo UNIVAC's success by unleashing its superior sales force to successfully market their inferior but backwards-compatible competing computer products; Thomas J. Watson Sr. and Thomas J. Watson Jr.'s stewardship of IBM's computer business; the expansion of the computer market to a growing number of companies during the late 1950s and early 1960s suck as Burroughs, NCR, Control Data Corporation, Honeywell and Philco; computer programming languages developed to convert binary code into Fortran and Cobol; the introduction of the computer into industry and farming; Automation and its threat to the labor workforce; ERMA and its revolutionizing the processing of checks in the banking industry; the transistor's replacement of vacuum tubes in computers, revolutionizing their construction; the "tyranny of numbers", the complexity of wiring multiple computer components, which prevented more powerful computers from being built; the invention of the integrated circuit by Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments and Robert Noyce of Fairchild Semiconductor; the revolutionizing of missile technology by the integrated circuit; the genesis of Silicon Valley; the installation of a light-weight UNIVAC-strength computer aboard the Apollo LEM spacecraft to guide it to safe manned landing on the Moon; amateur computer enthusiasts such as Stephen Wozniak and Steve Jobs form computer clubs and organize to ultimately result in the personal computer; more (With Ted Withington, Computer Industry Analyst; Paul Ceruzzi, Smithsonian Institution; J. Presper Eckert, Co-Inventor of ENIAC and UNIVAC; Morris Hansen, U.S. Census Bureau; John Pinketon, Chief Engineer, Lyons; Thomas J. Watson, Jr., Chairman of IBM; James Birkenstock, Vice Presiddent of IBM; Jean Sammet, Historian, Programming Languages; Dick Davis, Sr. Vice President of Bank Of America; Robert Noyce, Co-Inventor; Gordon Moore, Chairman Of The Board, Intel Corporation; Stephen Wozniak, Co-Founder, Apple Computer)


VOLUME TWO:

Episode 3: The Paperback Computer: The frustration of computer programmers with small errors rendering entire programs unusable; The Computer Sketchpad, the first computer to process graphics-based commands, and thereby the first interactive computer, based on the work of Ivan Sutherland; Douglas Engelbart of Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center), visionary of the interactive computer, who pioneered the use of the Computer Mouse and revolutionized how users interacted with computers; how studies of children's interaction with their environment influenced the design of interactive computers; Xerox's genesis of word processing computers; the emergence of the microprocessor; the Altair 8800, the first true personal computer; the birth of the Apple I computer, the first consumer market desktop personal computer; the IBM Personal Computer; the Apple Macintosh, the first successful mass-market all-in-one desktop personal computer to have featured a graphical user interface (GUI), built-in screen, and mouse, built with lessons learned by Steve Jobs from Xerox PARC; the graphical program explosion of software designed to work on Apple utilizing user-friendly interfaces to create music, art, pie chart graphs, engineering diagrams and more, and for playing video games; the rise of Bill Gates and Microsoft; the utility of computers to children and the handicapped; the genesis of virtual reality technology; more (With Mitchell Kapor, Founder of Lotus Software; Theodor Holm Nelson, Author, "Computer Lib"; Douglas Englbart, Computer Engineer, Xerox Corporation; Larry Tesler, Xerox PARC 1973-1980; Alan Kay, Xerox PARC 1972-1980; Robert Taylor, Xerox PARC 1970-1983; Ted Holt, Co-Developer, Microprocessor; Steve Jobs, Co-founder, Apple Computer; Stephen Wozniak, Co-founder, Apple Computer; Mike Markkula, Angel Investor in and CEO of Apple Computer, Inc.; Lee Felsenstein, Homebrew Computer Club; Bill Gates, Co-founder of Microsoft; Chris Peters, Microsoft "Supremo" (a chief sofware engineer); Anne Myer, Center For Applied Special Technology; Matthew Huggins, intelligent cerebral palsy victim whose use of the computer frees him to learn and communicate freely with others; Dr. Henry Fuchs, UNC, Chapel Hill; Dr. Jane Richards, UNC, Chapel Hill; Dr. Frederick P. Brooks, Jr., UNC, Chapel Hill)

Episode 4: The Thinking Machine: The quest for artificial intelligence; Jerome Wiesner of MIT's Research Laboratory Of Electronics; Marvin Minksy and John McCarthy, founders in 1958 of the MIT Computer Science And Artificial Intelligence Laboratory; MIT student James Robert Slagle's program that got an A and the MIT calculus test; the quest to program computers to think like humans, play chess, etc.; the difficulties computers have in basic logic due to programmer's assumptions; the difficulties in teaching machines how to navigate obstacles; how computers fail the Turing Test when humans talk to them in the vernacular; the difficulties of computer-translating different human languages; machine learning; Dr, Terry Winograd's SHRDLU program for using natural language to have computers work in "microworlds" performing small microtasks within which they can operate competently; Dr. Feigenbaum's AI breakthrough in designing a program to analyze and interpret spectrographs as or more expertly than humans for use in medicine and science; facial and object recognition technology; artificial neural networking development for navigation and replicating human speech; the earliest development of self-contained independent AI robots; more (With Dr. Marvin Minsky, MIT; Dr. Hubert Dreyfus, University Of California, Berkeley; Dr. Edward Feigenbaum; Stanford University; Oliver G. Selfridge, Lincoln Laboratories; Claude Shannon, "the father of information theory"; Dr. Hans Moravec, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University; Dr. Doug Lenat, University Of Texas, Austin; Dr. Terry Winograd; MIT Computer Programmer; Dr. Dean Omperleau, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University)


VOLUME THREE:

Episode 5: The World At Your Fingertips: Global interconnectivity of computers which would eventually become known as the internet; the capacity of computers and networks to store, search and exchange text, audio and images in digital formats resident on hard drives and optical discs and sent through telephone and other electronic cables ranging from books to personal and private information, information we now call "Big Data"; the usefulness of digitation to preserve works of art like the Sistine Chapel; the emerging use of networks to connect to news, shopping sites, weather reports, trevel agencies and connect to electronic bulletin boards and send email; the use of networks for financial trading and business transactions; the scramble for stock markets to adjust to this new technology, with notable successes and failures; the unprecendented speed with which scientific discoveries could be disseminated, reviewed and critiqued; how networks enable communications with large international online communities of people with similar problems and interests; the loss of individual privacy brought brought by big data; the problems computer errors and surveillance cause humans financially and professionally; the emergence of computer technology societies like Singapore; computer management of mass transit; the power computer networks have to organize social movements, activism and protests; the dangerous and potentially lethal effects of medical software malfunction due to unforseen bugs; the vulnerability of international communications due to unforseen computer bugs; television series review; more (With Robert Lucky, AT & T Bell Labs; George Hayter, Head Of Trading, London Stock Exchange; Ben Bagdikian, University Of California, Berkeley; Arthur Miller, Harvard Law School; Mitchell Kapor, On Technology, Inc.; Paul Ceruzzi, Smithsonian Institution)


A Computer is a digital electronic machine that can be programmed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations (computation) automatically. Modern computers can perform generic sets of operations known as programs. These programs enable computers to perform a wide range of tasks. A computer system is a "complete" computer that includes the hardware, operating system (main software), and peripheral equipment needed and used for "full" operation. This term may also refer to a group of computers that are linked and function together, such as a computer network or computer cluster. A broad range of industrial and consumer products use computers as control systems. Simple special-purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls are included, as are factory devices like industrial robots and computer-aided design, as well as general-purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices like smartphones. Computers power the Internet, which links billions of other computers and users. Early computers were meant to be used only for calculations. Simple manual instruments like the abacus have aided people in doing calculations since ancient times. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms. More sophisticated electrical machines did specialized analog calculations in the early 20th century. The first digital electronic calculating machines were developed during World War II. The first semiconductor transistors in the late 1940s were followed by the silicon-based MOSFET (MOS transistor) and monolithic integrated circuit (IC) chip technologies in the late 1950s, leading to the microprocessor and the microcomputer revolution in the 1970s. The speed, power and versatility of computers have been increasing dramatically ever since then, with transistor counts increasing at a rapid pace (as predicted by Moore's law), leading to the Digital Revolution during the late 20th to early 21st centuries. Conventionally, a modern computer consists of at least one processing element, typically a central processing unit (CPU) in the form of a microprocessor, along with some type of computer memory, typically semiconductor memory chips. The processing element carries out arithmetic and logical operations, and a sequencing and control unit can change the order of operations in response to stored information. Peripheral devices include input devices (keyboards, mice, joystick, etc.), output devices (monitor screens, printers, etc.), and input/output devices that perform both functions (e.g., the 2000s-era touchscreen). Peripheral devices allow information to be retrieved from an external source and they enable the result of operations to be saved and retrieved.