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The Johnstown Flood Documentary DVD, Video Download, USB Flash Drive

The Johnstown Flood Documentary DVD, Video Download, USB Flash Drive
The Johnstown Flood Documentary DVD, Video Download, USB Flash Drive
Item# the-johnstown-flood-the-great-flood-of-1889-in-johnstown-pennsylv1889
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The Johnstown Flood, The Catastrophic Failure Of The South Fork Dam On The Little Conemaugh River 14 Miles Upstream Of Johnstown, Pennsylvania (Where It Is Known As The Great Flood of 1889), Which Released 14.55 Million Cubic Meters Of Water With A Flow That Temporarily Equaled The Mississippi River, Killing Over 2,200 People And Destroying The Town! *Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! (Color, 1991, 58 Minutes.) #JohnstownFlood #GreatFloodOf1889 #SouthForkDam #LittleConemaughRiver #Johnstown #JohnstownPA #Disasters #DamFailures #AmericanHistory #USHistory #HistoryOfTheUS #DVD #VideoDownload #MP4 #USBFlashDrive

The Johnstown Flood (locally the Great Flood Of 1889) occurred on Friday, May 31, 1889, after the catastrophic failure of the South Fork Dam, located on the south fork of the Little Conemaugh River, 14 miles (23 km) upstream of the town of Johnstown, Pennsylvania. The dam broke after several days of extremely heavy rainfall, releasing 14.55 million cubic meters of water. With a volumetric flow rate that temporarily equaled the average flow rate of the Mississippi River, the flood killed 2,209 people and accounted for 17M USD of damage (about 490M USD in 2020 dollars). The American Red Cross, led by Clara Barton and with 50 volunteers, undertook a major disaster relief effort. Support for victims came from all over the United States and 18 foreign countries. After the flood, survivors suffered a series of legal defeats in their attempts to recover damages from the dam's owners. Public indignation at that failure prompted the development in American law changing a fault-based regime to one of strict liability.