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Paul Is Dead Paul McCartney Death Hoax Radio Shows MP3 CD Download USB

Paul Is Dead Paul McCartney Death Hoax Radio Shows MP3 CD Download USB
Paul Is Dead Paul McCartney Death Hoax Radio Shows MP3 CD Download USB
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The Great ''Paul McCartney Is Dead'' Hoax Of The 1960s Begins With Three Of History's Most Unusual Radio Broadcasts: WKNR-FM's Shocking October 12, 1969 "The Beatles Plot" Documentary By Disc Jockey Russ Gibb, The Infamous WABC-AM October 14, 1969 "Paul Is Dead" Broadcast By Roby Yonge, And The Extraordinary WABC-FM November 14, 1969 "Paul Is Dead" Broadcast By Bob "Bob-a-loo" Lewis In Its Updated June 1979 WPLJ Form With Pat St. John! All Presented As An Archival Quality MP3 CD, MP3 Audio Download Or USB Flash Drive! #PaulIsDead #DeathHoaxes #Hoaxes #UrbanLegends #ConspiracyTheories #PaulMcCartney #Beatles #TheBeatles #RussGibb #WKNRFM #WKNR #RobyYonge #WABCAM #WABC #BobalooLewis #BobLewis #BobBobalooLewis #BabaluLewis #WABCFM #PatStJohn #WPLJ #RadioShows #RadioBroacasts #DiscJockeys #DJs #RadioHistory #HistoryOfRadio #MP3 #CD #AudioDownload #USBFlashDrive

*10/15/21: Updated to include "The Paul Is Dead Broacast Bobaloo Lewis WABC-FM 691114 (Rebroadcast w/New Material Pat St. John WPLJ 7906XX)"!


Contents:

01 The Beatles Plot Brodcast Russ Gibb WKNR-FM 691012 [Remastered].mp3 (46:09)

02 The Paul Is Dead Broacast Roby Yonge WABC-AM 691021 [Remastered].mp3 (23:22)

03 The Paul Is Dead Broacast Bobaloo Lewis WABC-FM 691114 (Rebroadcast w/New Material Pat St. John WPLJ 7906XX) [Remastered].mp3 (31:00)


"Paul Is Dead" is an urban legend and conspiracy theory alleging that English musician Paul McCartney, of the Beatles, died on November 9, 1966 and was secretly replaced by a look-alike, most often named as Billy Shears, a character in the Beatles song Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The rumour began circulating around 1967, but grew in popularity after being reported on American college campuses in late 1969. Proponents based the theory on perceived clues found in Beatles songs and album covers. Clue-hunting proved infectious, and within a few weeks had become an international phenomenon. According to the theory, McCartney died in a car crash and, to spare the public from grief, the surviving Beatles replaced him with the winner of a McCartney look-alike contest, sometimes identified as "William Campbell" or "Billy Shears". Afterwards, the band left messages in their music and album artwork to communicate the truth to their fans. These include the 1968 song "Glass Onion", in which Lennon sings "here's another clue for you all / the walrus was Paul", and the cover photo of their album Abbey Road, in which McCartney is shown barefoot and walking out of step with his bandmates. Rumours declined after an interview with McCartney, who had been secluded with his family in Scotland, was published in Life magazine in November 1969. During the 1970s, the phenomenon was the subject of analysis in the fields of sociology, psychology and communications. McCartney parodied the hoax with the title and cover art of his 1993 live album, Paul Is Live. In 2009, Time magazine included "Paul Is Dead" in its feature on ten of "the world's most enduring conspiracy theories".


Russ Gibb (June 15, 1931 - April 30, 2019) was radio disc jockey, concert promoter, and media personality from Dearborn, Michigan, best known for his role in the "Paul Is Dead" phenomenon, a story he broke as a disc jockey on radio station WKNR-FM in Detroit. "Paul Is Dead" is an urban legend and conspiracy theory alleging that Paul McCartney, of the English rock band the Beatles, died in November 1966 and was secretly replaced by a look-alike. In September 1969, a rumour of McCartney's supposed death began spreading across college campuses in the United States. The rumour was based on perceived clues found in Beatles songs and album covers. Clue-hunting proved infectious, and within a few weeks had become an international phenomenon. On October 12, 1969, a caller to Detroit radio station WKNR-FM told disc jockey Russ Gibb about the rumor and its clues. Gibb and other callers then discussed the rumor on the air for the next hour. Two days after the WKNR broadcast, The Michigan Daily published a satirical review of Abbey Road by University of Michigan student Fred LaBour under the headline "McCartney Dead; New Evidence Brought to Light". It identified various clues to McCartney's death on Beatles album covers, including new clues from the just-released Abbey Road LP. As LaBour had invented many of the clues, he was astonished when the story was picked up by newspapers across the United States. Gibb further fueled the rumor with a special two-hour program on the subject, "The Beatle Plot", which aired on October 19, 1969, and in the years since on Detroit radio. Rumours declined after an interview with McCartney, who had been secluded with his family in Scotland, was published in Life magazine in November 1969. During the 1970s, the phenomenon was the subject of analysis in the fields of sociology, psychology and communications. References to the legend are still occasionally made in popular culture. McCartney himself poked fun at it with his 1993 live album, titling it Paul Is Live, with cover art parodying clues allegedly placed on the cover of the Beatles' album Abbey Road. In 2009, Time magazine included "Paul Is Dead" in its feature on ten of "the world's most enduring conspiracy theories". In 1966, Gibb began to operate the Grande Ballroom in Detroit, which he acquired while still employed both as as a WKNR-FM DJ and as a high school teacher in Dearborn, Michigan, He was a major player in the late 1960s and early 1970s Detroit music scene. He was instrumental in giving the MC5, Ted Nugent and Iggy Pop their start. The Grande Ballroom also was where The Who played their rock opera, Tommy, for the first time in the United States. Gibb also owned or leased other live music venues around the Midwest including the Eastown Theatre, Michigan Theater (where the New York Dolls played), and the Birmingham Palladium. He expanded his music endeavors when he invested in Creem magazine. He also purchased the licenses for cable tv for the Michigan cities of Dearborn, Wayne and Grosse Pointe in the late 1970s. During the administration of Gerald Ford he worked under Senator John Warner on the United States Bicentennial Commission as the National Director of Youth and Education.

Roby Yonge (July 25, 1943 - July 18, 1997) was an American radio DJ, most notable in the 1960s. He was best known for being fired from New York City station WABC-AM in 1969, after he reported over the air that the singer Paul McCartney might have died, circulating the now infamous Paul Is Dead folktale saga and conspiracy theory. On October 21, 1969, Roby Yonge went on the air with the Paul McCartney "death" rumor on WABC-AM during his overnight radio show, having heard the rumor from kids calling in from a college in Indiana, and as revenge for not having his contract renewed. In December 1967, Yonge moved to New York and WABC. Originally hired for the 1-3 PM shift, Yonge was moved into the overnight shift in August 1969 when Charlie Greer left the station. He was told by WABC program director Rick Sklar, in the early fall of that year, that his contract was up in two weeks and would not be renewed. Roby then told Sklar, "I won't be in anymore but you'll be famous in the morning". He subsequently went on the air and stated that his contract would not be renewed, and that since it was 12:39 AM, he would not be cut off the air because there was nobody around to cut him. Yonge then began to speculate on rumors circulating about the possible death of McCartney. He never said that Paul was dead, but rather enumerated various "clues" in album cover art and within certain songs, some played backwards with clues like "Paul Is Dead" and "I buried Paul" which he said had been catalogued by thirty Indiana University Bloomington students. Callers lit up the station switchboard. Since all the phone lines were jammed with thousands of calls, Rick Sklar could not get through to the station and it was an hour and a half before Program Director Sklar arrived at the station in his bath robe. He got Les Marshak the newsman on duty in the adjacent studio to relieve Yonge and Sklar told Roby, "When you come in tomorrow to do your show, I don't want you to talk any more about this McCartney might be dead rumor". The next day, many newspapers nationwide carried the story about the "is Paul dead" rumor and Roby Yonge. In an interview with his friend John Paul Roberts ("JPR"), former WQAM DJ, Roby said this about the Paul McCartney rumor, "I never said the guy is dead, and I don't say it now, but there's reason to believe something is going on".

Bob Lewis, popularly known as Bob-a-loo Lewis (Bobaloo Lewis, Babalu Lewis), American radio disc jockey and producer (? - January 23, 1987) was born in Queen, New York City, and received his moniker from the Doo Wop group The Eternals, whose 1959 hit record "Babalu's Wedding Day" is named in Lewis's honor. Prior to his employment by WABC, he was heard on WNHC in New Haven, Conn; and WMGM and WINS in New York City, In 1962, he began doing the Musicradio77 WABC-AM overnight show which he called "The All-Night Satellite". He eventually insisted on being taken off the demanding all-night shift and spent much of the rest of his tenure at the station, which lasted until 1969, doing weekends and fill-in work. Bob also started working at WABC-FM in the late 1960s, which is now WPLJ-FM, and was among the first wave of progressive air personalities in the Big Apple. On November 14, 1969, Lewis did a full production "Paul Is Dead" show on broadcast WABC-FM, putting forth many of the same assertions about McCartney's supposed death that had resulted in WABC alumnus Roby Yonge being yanked off the air only three weeks prior. In June 1979, the same station, now with call letters WPLJ, rebroadcast Boby Dayton's radio documentary with extra new material added by disc jockey Pat St. John. Bob later worked at WCBS-FM, before it adopted an oldies format, and then went to WNEW-FM as it emerged as a leader in the progressive rock movement. He became one of the top voiceover artists, handling work for such clients as Dreyfus, Certs, Volkswagen and IBM. Bob Dayton died of pneumonia in New York City at the age of 49.

Pat St. John, American radio personality and voice-over artist, was born February12, 1951. He began his radio career on Windsor, Ontario's CKLW (800 AM) in 1969 and 1970, followed by WKNR (1300 AM) in late 1970 to early 1972, followed by WRIF FM (101.1) to April 1973. St. John is best known for the 42 years he spent in the New York City radio market working for WPLJ, WNEW-FM, WAXQ and WCBS FM. He can now be heard on Sirius XM Radio '60s on 6 Weekdays 3PM to 7 PM ET and on Classic Rewind Weekends 6PM to midnight ET. St. John has done television voiceover work, including announcing for Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve from 2000 to 2010. St. John is known for his conversational on-air style interspersed with bits of music trivia, along with "Collectible Cuts" from his extensive record library. He has been called a "walking encyclopedia" when it comes to his knowledge of music. St. John has interviewed many musicians. St. John was born in Detroit and was raised on the music of Motown. In early 1969, at the age of 18, he landed his first gig as a radio personality on Windsor's CKLW, where he also worked for CKLW's 20/20 news doing newscasts one day a week, and part-time booth announcing on CKLW-TV Channel 9. In late 1970 he moved across the border to WKNR and was then hired in early 1972 at the ABC-owned album-oriented rock (AOR) station WRIF until 1973. In April 1973, St. John began an almost 15-year stint at New York's WPLJ. In June 1979, Pat St. John rebroadcast Boby Dayton's November 14, 1969 radio documentary "Paul Is Dead", with extra new material added by Pat St. John, putting forth many of the same assertions about McCartney's supposed death that had resulted in WABC alumnus Roby Yonge being yanked off the air only three weeks prior to Dayton's broadcast. For most of his years at WPLJ, Pat St. John was rated by Arbitron as the most-listened-to afternoon radio personality in America (source: ARB's "Drive-Time Dominaters"). He survived the station's transition from AOR to top 40 in 1983, and during that era, continued his Arbitron ratings success with that same ranking. He left WPLJ in 1987, and returned to his rock roots on WNEW-FM, which had been WPLJ's rival during its AOR years. He became the station's program director in the early 1990s while continuing his mid-day show until being asked to do morning-drive (which he did from 1994 through 1996) and then moved to afternoons where then followed Scott Muni who moved to mid-days). St. John remained with the station until it switched to a hot talk format in 1998. After the demise of WNEW's rock format, St. John was one of the first programmers hired by CD Radio in October 1998 as the Director of classic Rock Programming. CD Radio would later change its name to Sirius Satellite Radio, and then after acquiring XM Satellite Radio become known as SiriusXM, where he remains today as one of their most popular personalities. He also joined WCBS-FM in 2002, followed by moving to WAXQ in 2004 where he stayed until late 2006. In July 2007, he returned to the re-incarnated WCBS-FM following the station's short-lived detour to "Jack FM". In February 2008, St. John actually replaced Howard Cogan as the pre-recorded voice of the Jack character on WCBS-FM-HD2 and its web stream at ilikejack.com until it became ToNY (meaning "To New York" but pronounced "Tony" until later simulcasting WCBS News Radio 880 in December 2012. For the first decade of the new century he was the announcer for Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve. He continues to do voiceover work for radio and TV commercials as well as station imaging for radio and television as well as narration. During St. John's years with satellite radio he has been heard on such channels as "60s Vibrations", "The Vault", Deep Tracks, and "Sirius Blues" (where he was also the channel's format manager and program director). Since Sirius' merger with former rival XM in 2008, he can be heard on '60s on 6 classic rock. He has also been the voice of Metropolitan Opera Radio on the service, further showing his versatility. St. John was also chosen to announce system-wide that Howard Stern would be joining Sirius. St. John's association with classic rock has continued throughout the years as he has been asked for his input on several classic rock projects. He was thanked in the liner notes of albums by Marvin Gaye and Jr. Walker and The All-Stars, as well as the box-sets of Stevie Wonder and The Temptations. St. John is the narrator (along with Smokey Robinson and Lionel Richie) of the two-CD set "The classic rock Story Volume 1: The 1960s". He can also be heard on classic rock's web site narrating several classic rock stories. St. John has been recognized by Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland by being added to their permanent display of America's Greatest Classic Rock Air Personalities. April 9, 2013 marked St. John's 40th anniversary on New York radio, making him New York's longest running air personality. In March 2015, St. John announced that he was leaving WCBS-FM and that he and his wife were moving to California to be closer to their grandson. He aired his final show on April 12, 2015. St. John and his wife live in San Diego where he broadcasts his 60s on 6 and rock'n roll shows from a barn on their property.