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Paul Is Dead Paul McCartney Death Hoax Radio Shows MP3 CD Download USB

Paul Is Dead Paul McCartney Death Hoax Radio Shows MP3 CD Download USB
Paul Is Dead Paul McCartney Death Hoax Radio Shows MP3 CD Download USB
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The Great ''Paul McCartney Is Dead'' Hoax Of The 1960s Begins With Two Of History's Most Unusual Radio Broadcasts: WKNR-FM's Shocking WKNR Oct. 12th 1969 "The Beatles Plot" Documentary By Disc Jockey Russ Gibb, And The Infamous WABC-AM Oct. 14th 1969 "Paul Is Dead" Broadcast By Roby Yonge, All Presented As An Archival Quality MP3 CD, MP3 Audio Download Or USB Flash Drive! #PaulIsDead #DeathHoaxes #Hoaxes #UrbanLegends #ConspiracyTheories #PaulMcCartney #Beatles #TheBeatles #RussGibb #WKNRFM #WKNR #RobyYonge #WABCAM #WABC #RadioShows #RadioBroacasts #DiscJockeys #DJs #RadioHistory #HistoryOfRadio #MP3 #CD #AudioDownload #USBFlashDrive

Contents:

01 The Beatles Plot by WKNR: WKNR-FM Detroit 19691012 - The Beatles Plot [Remastered].mp3 (46:09)
02 The Paul Is Dead Broadcast by Roby Yonge" Paul Is Dead Broacast Roby Yonge WABC 691021.mp3 (23:22)


"Paul is dead" is an urban legend and conspiracy theory alleging that English musician Paul McCartney, of the Beatles, died on November 9 1966 and was secretly replaced by a look-alike, most often named as Billy Shears, a character in the Beatles song Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The rumour began circulating around 1967, but grew in popularity after being reported on American college campuses in late 1969. Proponents based the theory on perceived clues found in Beatles songs and album covers. Clue-hunting proved infectious, and within a few weeks had become an international phenomenon. According to the theory, McCartney died in a car crash and, to spare the public from grief, the surviving Beatles replaced him with the winner of a McCartney look-alike contest, sometimes identified as "William Campbell" or "Billy Shears". Afterwards, the band left messages in their music and album artwork to communicate the truth to their fans. These include the 1968 song "Glass Onion", in which Lennon sings "here's another clue for you all / the walrus was Paul", and the cover photo of their album Abbey Road, in which McCartney is shown barefoot and walking out of step with his bandmates. Rumours declined after an interview with McCartney, who had been secluded with his family in Scotland, was published in Life magazine in November 1969. During the 1970s, the phenomenon was the subject of analysis in the fields of sociology, psychology and communications. McCartney parodied the hoax with the title and cover art of his 1993 live album, Paul Is Live. In 2009, Time magazine included "Paul is dead" in its feature on ten of "the world's most enduring conspiracy theories".

Russ Gibb (June 15, 1931 - April 30, 2019) was radio disc jockey, concert promoter, and media personality from Dearborn, Michigan, best known for his role in the "Paul is dead" phenomenon, a story he broke as a disc jockey on radio station WKNR-FM in Detroit. "Paul is dead" is an urban legend and conspiracy theory alleging that Paul McCartney, of the English rock band the Beatles, died in November 1966 and was secretly replaced by a look-alike. In September 1969, a rumour of McCartney's supposed death began spreading across college campuses in the United States. The rumour was based on perceived clues found in Beatles songs and album covers. Clue-hunting proved infectious, and within a few weeks had become an international phenomenon. On October 12, 1969, a caller to Detroit radio station WKNR-FM told disc jockey Russ Gibb about the rumor and its clues. Gibb and other callers then discussed the rumor on the air for the next hour. Two days after the WKNR broadcast, The Michigan Daily published a satirical review of Abbey Road by University of Michigan student Fred LaBour under the headline "McCartney Dead; New Evidence Brought to Light". It identified various clues to McCartney's death on Beatles album covers, including new clues from the just-released Abbey Road LP. As LaBour had invented many of the clues, he was astonished when the story was picked up by newspapers across the United States. Gibb further fueled the rumor with a special two-hour program on the subject, "The Beatle Plot", which aired on October 19, 1969, and in the years since on Detroit radio. Rumours declined after an interview with McCartney, who had been secluded with his family in Scotland, was published in Life magazine in November 1969. During the 1970s, the phenomenon was the subject of analysis in the fields of sociology, psychology and communications. References to the legend are still occasionally made in popular culture. McCartney himself poked fun at it with his 1993 live album, titling it Paul Is Live, with cover art parodying clues allegedly placed on the cover of the Beatles' album Abbey Road. In 2009, Time magazine included "Paul is dead" in its feature on ten of "the world's most enduring conspiracy theories". In 1966, Gibb began to operate the Grande Ballroom in Detroit, which he acquired while still employed both as as a WKNR-FM DJ and as a high school teacher in Dearborn, Michigan, He was a major player in the late 1960s and early 1970s Detroit music scene. He was instrumental in giving the MC5, Ted Nugent and Iggy Pop their start. The Grande Ballroom also was where The Who played their rock opera, Tommy, for the first time in the United States. Gibb also owned or leased other live music venues around the Midwest including the Eastown Theatre, Michigan Theater (where the New York Dolls played), and the Birmingham Palladium. He expanded his music endeavors when he invested in Creem magazine. He also purchased the licenses for cable tv for the Michigan cities of Dearborn, Wayne and Grosse Pointe in the late 1970s. During the administration of Gerald Ford he worked under Senator John Warner on the United States Bicentennial Commission as the National Director of Youth and Education.

Roby Yonge (July 25, 1943 - July 18, 1997) was an American radio DJ, most notable in the 1960s. He was best known for being fired from New York City station WABC-AM in 1969, after he reported over the air that the singer Paul McCartney might have died, circulating the now infamous Paul is Dead folktale saga and conspiracy theory.