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Nuclear War Films #12 Operation Fishbowl DVD, Video Download, USB

Nuclear War Films #12 Operation Fishbowl DVD, Video Download, USB
Nuclear War Films #12 Operation Fishbowl DVD, Video Download, USB
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Declassified U. S. Government Films Detailing How America Planned To Win A Nuclear War! *Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! #NuclearWeaponsTestingFilms #NuclearWeaponsTesting #NuclearWeapons #AtomicWeapons #ThermonuclearWeapons #NuclearWar #AtomicWar #ThermonuclearWar #WeaponsTests #NuclearWeaponsTests #NuclearWeaponsTestsFilms #Abombs #AtomBombs #AtomBomb #AtomicBomb #AtomicBombs #HBombs #HydrogenBombs #Nukes #NuclearWarheads #NuclearBombs #Films #Movies #GovernmentInformationFilms #ClassifiedFilms #FormerlyClassifiedFilms #DVD #VideoDownload #MP4 #USBFlashDrive

VOLUME XII: OPERATION FISHBOWL
High Altitude Testing Is Resumed & Evaluated

Contents:

Fishbowl High-Altitude Weapons Effects (1962, Sound, 27:50)
The high-altitude detonation experiments utilizing the Thor ballistic missile that comprised the Operation Fishbowl series of tests were themselves a subset of the much larger 36 air drop test series of Operation Dominic. They were a more comprehensive response to the Soviet Union's breaking its nuclear test moratorium agreement with the United States than the modest first response tests that were Operation Nougat a couple of weeks after the treaty abrogation. This film documents with easy-to-follow illustrations the major aspects of the Fishbowl test series.

Four Films:1) Starfish Prime Event Interim Report By Commander JTF-8 (Sound); 2) Fishbowl Auroral Sequences (Silent); 3) Dominic On Fishbowl Phenomenon (Silent); 4) Fishbowl XR Summary (Silent) {1962, 1:09:22}
A films series intended to debrief the subject of Operation Fishbowl aerial photography. The first film exhibits the particulars of the Starfish Prime test of Operation Fishbowl, then displays a large variety of unearthly aerial test film sequences.

High-Altitude Nuclear Weapons Effects - Part One - Phenomenology (1963, Sound,20:05)
A well produced and comprehensive evaluation of the general high atmospheric test results and the particular examples from the Fishbowl test series cited by this evaluation. The illustrations particularly succeed, in terms clarity and presentation, in making an otherwise highly complicated subject relatively easy to grasp and understand.

NOTE: Due to the classified nature of some of their subject matter, the U.S. Department of Defense has in small sections silenced the audio tracks or still-framed the video tracks of some of these films. These portions are not a product defect, are short in duration, and do not detract from a satisfying viewing experience.


Operation Fishbowl was a series of high-altitude nuclear tests in 1962 that were carried out by the United States as a part of the larger Operation Dominic nuclear test program. Flight-test vehicles were designed and manufactured by Avco Corporation. The Operation Fishbowl nuclear tests were originally planned to be completed during the first half of 1962 with three tests named Bluegill, Starfish and Urraca. The first test attempt was delayed until June. Planning for Operation Fishbowl, as well as many other nuclear tests in the region, began rapidly in response to the sudden Soviet announcement on August 30, 1961 that they were ending a three-year moratorium on nuclear testing. The rapid planning of very complex operations necessitated many changes as the project progressed. All of the tests were to be launched on missiles from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean north of the equator. Johnston Island had already been established as a launch site for United States high-altitude nuclear tests, rather than the other locations in the Pacific Proving Grounds. In 1958, Lewis Strauss, then chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, opposed doing any high-altitude tests at locations that had been used for earlier Pacific nuclear tests. His opposition was motivated by fears that the flash from the nighttime high-altitude detonations might blind civilians who were living on nearby islands. Johnston Island was a remote location, more distant from populated areas than other potential test locations. In order to protect residents of the Hawaiian Islands from flash blindness or permanent retinal injury from the bright nuclear flash, the nuclear missiles of Operation Fishbowl were launched generally toward the southwest of Johnston Island so that the detonations would be farther from Hawaii. Urraca was to be a test of about 1 megaton yield at very high altitude (above 1000 km.). The proposed Urraca test was always controversial, especially after the damage caused to satellites by the Starfish Prime detonation. Ariel 1 was among several satellites inadvertently damaged or destroyed by the Starfish Prime high-altitude nuclear test on July 9, 1962, and subsequent radiation belt. Its solar panels sustained damage from the irradiation, affecting Ariel 1's operations. The satellite operated even after the nuclear test. The radiation disabled the timer that would have deactivated the satellite after one year, effectively extending the satellite's life (Ariel 1 decayed from orbit on 24 May 1976). Urraca was finally canceled, and an extensive re-evaluation of the Operation Fishbowl plan was made during an 82-day operations pause after the Bluegill Prime disaster of July 25, 1962. A test named Kingfish was added during the early stages of Operation Fishbowl planning. Two low-yield tests, Checkmate and Tightrope, were also added during the project, so the final number of tests in Operation Fishbowl was five.

Nuclear Weapons Tests are experiments carried out to determine the effectiveness, yield, and explosive capability of nuclear weapons. Testing nuclear weapons offers practical information about how the weapons function, as well as how detonations are affected by different conditions; and how personnel, structures, and equipment are affected when subjected to nuclear explosions. However, nuclear testing has often been used as an indicator of scientific and military strength, and many tests have been overtly political in their intention; most nuclear weapons states publicly declared their nuclear status by means of a nuclear test. The first nuclear device was detonated as a test by the United States at the Trinity site in New Mexico on July 16, 1945, with a yield approximately equivalent to 20 kilotons of TNT. The first thermonuclear weapon technology test of an engineered device, codenamed "Ivy Mike", was tested at the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands on November 1, 1952 (local date), also by the United States. The largest nuclear weapon ever tested was the "Tsar Bomba" of the Soviet Union at Novaya Zemlya on October 30, 1961, with the largest yield ever seen, an estimated 50-58 megatons. In 1963, three (UK, US, Soviet Union) of the then four nuclear states and many non-nuclear states signed the Limited Test Ban Treaty, pledging to refrain from testing nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, underwater, or in outer space. The treaty permitted underground nuclear testing. France continued atmospheric testing until 1974, and China continued until 1980. Neither has signed the treaty. Underground tests in the Soviet Union continued until 1990, the United Kingdom until 1991, the United States until 1992 (its last nuclear test), and both China and France until 1996. In signing the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in 1996, these states have pledged to discontinue all nuclear testing; the treaty has not yet entered into force because of failure to be ratified by eight countries. Non-signatories India and Pakistan last tested nuclear weapons in 1998. North Korea conducted nuclear tests in 2006, 2009, 2013, 2016, and 2017. As of May 20, 2021, the most recent confirmed nuclear test occurred in September 2017 in North Korea.