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Making Sex Pay: Cost/Benefit Species Analysis DVD, Download, USB Drive

Making Sex Pay: Cost/Benefit Species Analysis DVD, Download, USB Drive
Making Sex Pay: Cost/Benefit Species Analysis DVD, Download, USB Drive
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What It Takes From Both Sexes To Make The Mating Game Work, Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! (Color, 1987, 52 Minutes.) #MakingSexPay #SexualIntercourse #Coitus #Copulation #AnimalSexualBehaviour #Sex #Mating #MatingRituals #DVD #MP4 #VideoDownload

Whether it be a man and a woman or the birds and the bees, you don't get something for nothing in the wide wild world of sex. It is, throughout the human and animal kingdoms, a heavy investment of time and/or resources, and you have to pay to play, even if you're a cheater like some of the male of the species of the salmon or bluegill variety. All this is governed by the over-riding need of both the male and female of all species: to reproduce and pass on their genes to the next generation. To that end, humans, both men and woman, value kindness and intelligence above all, but after that, the requirements for mating change: the women require of a male the power to provide and protect, and men want from women beauty, both physical and behavioral, as a significator of fertility and health. But in other species, the needs can be very different, and often quite amazing and mysterious, as evinced by the willingness of the male of some spider species to be eaten during mating, the strange and sometimes inexplicable variations of the plumage of the males of some bird species, the huge life-sustaining spermatophores of the male Katydid that make the females of their species do practically whatever it takes to make the male choose them as mates, and so on. This 1987 installment of the BBC's Horizon television series investigates all these things and more as it seeks to remind us that we humans, for all that we are civilized, are in our most basic behavior still passionately as well as practically animals, and celebrates that fact as the most natural thing for us to be.


Sexual Intercourse (or Coitus or Copulation) is a sexual activity typically involving the insertion and thrusting of the penis into the vagina for sexual pleasure, reproduction, or both. This is also known as vaginal intercourse or vaginal sex. Other forms of penetrative sexual intercourse include anal sex (penetration of the anus by the penis), oral sex (penetration of the mouth by the penis or oral penetration of the female genitalia), fingering (sexual penetration by the fingers) and penetration by use of a dildo (especially a strap-on dildo). These activities involve physical intimacy between two or more individuals and are usually used among humans solely for physical or emotional pleasure and can contribute to human bonding. There are different views on what constitutes sexual intercourse or other sexual activity, which can impact on views on sexual health. Although sexual intercourse, particularly the term coitus, generally denotes penile-vaginal penetration and the possibility of creating offspring, it also commonly denotes penetrative oral sex and penile-anal sex, especially the latter. It usually encompasses sexual penetration, while non-penetrative sex has been labeled "outercourse", but non-penetrative sex may also be considered sexual intercourse. Sex, often a shorthand for sexual intercourse, can mean any form of sexual activity. Because people can be at risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections during these activities, safer sex practices are recommended by health professionals to reduce transmission risk. Various jurisdictions place restrictions on certain sexual acts, such as incest, sexual activity with minors, prostitution, rape, zoophilia, sodomy, premarital and extramarital sex. Religious beliefs also play a role in personal decisions about sexual intercourse or other sexual activity, such as decisions about virginity, or legal and public policy matters. Religious views on sexuality vary significantly between different religions and sects of the same religion, though there are common themes, such as prohibition of adultery. Reproductive sexual intercourse between non-human animals is more often called copulation, and sperm may be introduced into the female's reproductive tract in non-vaginal ways among the animals, such as by cloacal copulation. For most non-human mammals, mating and copulation occur at the point of estrus (the most fertile period of time in the female's reproductive cycle), which increases the chances of successful impregnation. However, bonobos, dolphins and chimpanzees are known to engage in sexual intercourse regardless of whether the female is in estrus, and to engage in sex acts with same-sex partners. Like humans engaging in sexual activity primarily for pleasure, this behavior in these animals is also presumed to be for pleasure, and a contributing factor to strengthening their social bonds.

Animal Sexual Behaviour takes many different forms, including within the same species. Common mating or reproductively motivated systems include monogamy, polygyny, polyandry, polygamy and promiscuity. Other sexual behaviour may be reproductively motivated (e.g. sex apparently due to duress or coercion and situational sexual behaviour) or non-reproductively motivated (e.g. interspecific sexuality, sexual arousal from objects or places, sex with dead animals, homosexual sexual behaviour, and bisexual sexual behaviour). When animal sexual behaviour is reproductively motivated, it is often termed mating or copulation; for most non-human mammals, mating and copulation occur at oestrus (the most fertile period in the mammalian female's reproductive cycle), which increases the chances of successful impregnation. Some animal sexual behaviour involves competition, sometimes fighting, between multiple males. Females often select males for mating only if they appear strong and able to protect themselves. The male that wins a fight may also have the chance to mate with a larger number of females and will therefore pass on his genes to their offspring. Historically, it was believed that only humans and a small number of other species performed sexual acts other than for reproduction, and that animals' sexuality was instinctive and a simple "stimulus-response" behaviour. However, in addition to homosexual behaviours, a range of species masturbate and may use objects as tools to help them do so. Sexual behaviour may be tied more strongly to establishment and maintenance of complex social bonds across a population which support its success in non-reproductive ways. Both reproductive and non-reproductive behaviours can be related to expressions of dominance over another animal or survival within a stressful situation (such as sex due to duress or coercion).

Sex is a trait that determines an individual's reproductive function, male or female, in animals and plants that propagate their species through sexual reproduction. The type of gametes produced by an organism defines its sex. Commonly in plants and animals, male organisms produce smaller gametes (spermatozoa, sperm) while female organisms produce larger gametes (ova, often called egg cells). Organisms that produce both types of gametes are called hermaphrodites. During sexual reproduction, male and female gametes fuse to form zygotes that develop into offspring that inherit a selection of the traits of each parent. Males and females of a species may be similar (sexual monomorphism), or have physical differences (sexual dimorphism). The differences reflect the different reproductive pressures the sexes experience. For instance, mate choice and sexual selection can accelerate the evolution of physical differences between the sexes. The terms male and female typically do not apply in sexually undifferentiated species in which the individuals are isomorphic (look the same) and the gametes are isogamous (indistinguishable in size and shape), such as the green alga Ulva lactuca. If there are instead functional differences between gametes, such as in fungi, they may be referred to as mating types. Sex is genetically determined in most mammals by the XY sex-determination system, where male mammals carry an X and a Y chromosome (XY), whereas female mammals carry two X chromosomes (XX). Other chromosomal sex-determination systems in animals include the ZW system in birds, and the X0 system in insects. Various environmental systems include temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles and crustaceans.