* EarthStation1.com 1996-2021: Join us as we celebrate 25 years online!

Korean War Films And Documentaries Collection DVD, MP4 Download, USB

Korean War Films And Documentaries Collection DVD, MP4 Download, USB
Korean War Films And Documentaries Collection DVD, MP4 Download, USB
Item# korean-war-films-and-documentaries-dvd
List Price: $19.96
Your Sale Price: $9.49
Choose DVD, Video Download or USB Flash Drive Version: 

9.49 USD. Free Shipping Worldwide!

11 Classic TV Documentaries And 1950s Newsreel And Government Information Films Reformatted For Classroom Presentation - 2 1/2 Hours Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! #KoreanWar #KoreanConflict #ColdWars #KoreanConflict #ColdWars #NorthKorea #SouthKorea #UnitedStates #US #UnitedNations #UN #PoliceActions #ColdWar #DVD #VideoDownload #MP4 #USBFlashDrive


Contents:

BACK TO FREEDOM: MORE WAR PRISONERS RETURN TO AMERICA (1953, 0:47)
437 American POWs return to the US as friends, families, girlfriends & wives greet them at the pier.

GETTING READY PHYSICALLY (1951, 10:26)
A film intended to prepare high school boys for the draft by alerting them to what was awaiting them in basic training and on the battlefield and by directing them to get physically fit via their local community recreational services. Part of the "Are You Ready For Service?" series.

NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE SCREEN, MARCH: WAR MANEUVER IN KOREA / AUSTRALIA: ALLY IN THE PACIFIC (1952, 20:41)
Specially created for classroom use, these two Warner/Pathe newsreels tell the story of the heavily contested territories along the North & South Korean force deployments and of the great military assistance America's long-standing ally, Australia, continued to give during the Korean conflict.

ORPHANED KOREAN BOY ARRIVES IN SAN FRANCISCO (Early 195Os, 0:30)
The ocean liner USS President Cleveland brings a 5 year old war refugee to the loving arms of former service airman Bill Pond and Pond's mother.

RELIEF SUPPLIES FOR KOREA (Early 1950s, 0:39)
The American-Korean Foundation contributed cargo for the relief ship Hawaiian Bear to be shipped from the Port of Stockton, California to the port of Pusan, Korea after Chief Justice Earl Warren's daughter Nina and the Korean Ambassador perform the ribbon cutting ceremony.

SERVICE AND CITIZENSHIP (1951, 10:28)
Before there was either the book or film entitled "Starship Troopers" to propagandize schoolkids that service guarantees citizenship, there was this film to propagandize schoolboys that learning good citizenship by staying and getting good grades in school guarantees good military service. Another part of the "Are Your Ready For Service?" series.

STARTING NOW (1951, 10:40)
Yet another part of the "Are Your Ready For Service?" series, this one focusing on personal acceptance of and preparation for the draft, through the assistance of recruiters, high school counselors, periodicals, vets, clergy & more. All the parts of the "Are Your Ready For Service?" series are a unique insight into a part of U.S. history often glossed over - the expectancy and perceived necessity to persuade youth to fully and unquestioningly commit to the military imperatives of the nation.

SURVIVAL: CHOSIN BREAKOUT 1950 (1964, 24 Minutes)
James Whitmore hosts and narrates this investigation of the causes and consequences of the epic Chinese encirclement of US Forces at North Korea's Chosin Reservoir and their heroic fighting retreat to escape by sea.

THE CRIME OF KOREA (1950, 15:10)
A telling of the history of the five years between the liberation of Korea from Japan in 1945 to the invasion of South Korea by the North in 1950 through the voice of a fictionalized war correspondant. The Department of Defense had the Signal Corp use archival footage to tell that story, cast in the frosty terms of the Cold War that was being hotly fought out on the battlefields of Korea.

THE NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE SCREEN: VOLUME 1 ISSUE 6 (1951, 21:29)
Specially created for classroom use, this newsreel includes: United Nations comdemnation of China for the invasion of Korea; General Eisenhower on Atlantic Pact defenses; the opening of the 82nd Congress; liquid air; Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg address re-enactment; more!

THE NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE SCREEN, OCTOBER: VOLUME 4 ISSUE 2 (1953, 23:14)
Also created for classroom use, this newsreel includes: "Report on Korea" (Indian soldiers join allies; Chinese & Korean POWs; President Eisenhower & First Ladie Mamie greet returning Korean War vet & son John; POW General Dean freed from captivity; more); "Report on Germany" (Adenauer wins election as Chancellor; communist agitators & police battle; East German children visit West Germany; more); "Military Science: Atomic Cannon" (Soldiers take heat tests in Mojave Desert; Nuclear Cannon fires nuclear warhead at test site; more); "America's Heritage" (5:34 bio of President Theodore Roosevelt); more!

THE NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE SCREEN, APRIL (1951, 18:49)
Another newsreel compilation specially created for classroom use, including Douglas MacArthur's return to the United States & his "Old Soldiers Never Die" farewell speech; French President Auriol visits US; a tour of the Chalk River atomic plant; more!

THE NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE SCREEN, MARCH: WAR MANEUVER IN KOREA / AUSTRALIA: ALLY IN THE PACIFIC (1952, 20:41)
A different version of the the same NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE SCREEN title in this collection.


On June 25, 1950, the Korean War began as North Korean troops, led by Soviet-built tanks, crossed the 38th parallel and launched a full scale invasion of South Korea following a series of clashes along the border. Five days later, U.S. ground forces entered the conflict. The Korean War was a war between North Korea (with the support of China and the Soviet Union) and South Korea (with the principal support of the United States). The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union also gave some assistance to the North. As a product of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, Korea was split into two regions with separate governments. Both claimed to be the legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither accepted the border as permanent. When the conflict escalated into open warfare when North Korea invaded South Korea, the United Nations Security Council authorized the formation and dispatch of UN forces to Korea to repel what was recognized as a North Korean invasion. Twenty-one countries of the United Nations eventually contributed to the UN force, with the United States providing around 90% of the military personnel. After the first two months of war, South Korean and U.S. forces rapidly dispatched to Korea were on the point of defeat, forced back to a small area in the south known as the Pusan Perimeter. In September 1950, an amphibious UN counter-offensive was launched at Incheon, and cut off many North Korean troops. Those who escaped envelopment and capture were forced back north. UN forces rapidly approached the Yalu River-the border with China-but in October 1950, mass Chinese forces crossed the Yalu and entered the war. The Chinese intervention triggered a retreat of UN forces which continued until mid-1951. After these reversals of fortune, which saw Seoul change hands four times, the last two years of fighting became a war of attrition, with the front line close to the 38th parallel. The war in the air, however, was never a stalemate. North Korea was subject to a massive bombing campaign. Jet fighters confronted each other in air-to-air combat for the first time in history, and Soviet pilots covertly flew in defense of their communist allies. The fighting ended on 27 July 1953, when an armistice was signed. The agreement created the Korean Demilitarized Zone to separate North and South Korea, and allowed the return of prisoners. However, no peace treaty has been signed at Panmunjon, and according to some sources the two Koreas are technically still at war, engaged in a frozen conflict. In April 2018, the leaders of North and South Korea met at the demilitarized zone and agreed to sign a treaty by the end of the year to formally end the Korean War. As a war undeclared by all participants, the conflict helped bring the term "police action" into common use. It also led to the permanent alteration of the balance of power within the United Nations, where Resolution 377-passed in 1950 to allow a bypassing of the Security Council if that body could not reach an agreement-led to the General Assembly displacing the Security Council as the primary organ of the UN.