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Counterculture Films Collection DVD, Video Download, USB Flash Drive

Counterculture Films Collection DVD, Video Download, USB Flash Drive
Counterculture Films Collection DVD, Video Download, USB Flash Drive
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6 Films About America's 1960-1970s Counterculture And The Youth Revolution! Over 2 Hours Presented In The Highest DVD Quality MPG Video Format Of 9.1 MBPS As An Archival Quality All Regions Format DVD, MP4 Video Download Or USB Flash Drive! #Counterculture #CountercultureOfThe1960s #AntiEstablishment #Sixties #TheSixties #60s #The60s #1960s #The1960s #Seventies #TheSeven #70s #The70s #1970s #The1970s #Protest #VietnamWar #AntiWarMovement #OppositionToTheVietnamWar #SexualRevolution #CoffeeHouses #UCLA UCLAMediaCenter #GreenwichVillage #Hippies #Hippys #Yippies #Hardhats #Squares #SixtiesGeneration #BabyBoomers #BabyBoom #Activism #StudentActivism #Teenagers #SocialChange #YouthCulture #Revolution #YouthRevolution #Drugs #PsychedelicDrugs #Psychedelia #RecreationalDrugs #Marijuana #Marihuana #Cannabis #MP4 #VideoDownload #DVD


Contents:

BRINK OF DISASTER (Color, 1972, 28:41)
A film which summons the spirits of a circa 1972 student activist's ancestors, who proceed to beat him up before setting back the clock, returning to haunt him, but also to educate him. The head of the History Department attempts to assist them in this re-education, explaining to the Vietnam War veteran / football player / honor student that he's an unwitting dupe of a communist conspiracy to undermine American society. Amidst footage of the March on the Pentagon and protests at Lafayette Park on the one hand, and film of the Berlin Wall and the Invasion of Hungary on the other, the activist learns "What's Right with America", which is said to be, quite candidly, materialist superiority. "The Commies" haven't duped the shades of the Pioneer farmer who know Ben Franklin, the Sailor who knew Fulton, and the Mechanic who knew Ford (Franklin, Fulton, Ford - one more "F" & he'd be "4F"), and they tell their variously grand & greatly grand son exactly that. They win him over, and he decides he won't let the student rioters into the library to wreak wanton destruction after all - rather, he'll go & beat the hell out of them instead, shoulder-to-shouder with his teacher & disembodied kinfolk...

COFFEE HOUSE RENDEZVOUS Color, (1969, 26:19)
The Coffee Institute gives its self-interested take on how coffee houses served as engines of social revolution - sort of - during the 1960s. Odd thing is, the coffee houses in question are sponsored by churches and other establishment concerns.

GREENWICH VILLAGE SUNDAY (Color, Early 1960s, 12:29)
The great Jean Shepherd of radio, television, movie and literary fame narrates this Stewart Willensky film documenting life and neighborhood of this celebrated cultural center at a celebrated moment in its history.

SOCIAL SEMINAR: CHANGING (Color, 1971, 27:49)
The National Institute of Mental Health sponsored UCLA's Extension Media Center to produce this film to illustrate how the 60s youth struggled to find an identity in a world of contradictory roles, morals and values, with special attention placed on deconstructing stereotypes such as hippie, hardhat, square, etc..

TRAGEDY OR HOPE (Color, 1972, 24:03)
Summons the spirits of a circa 1972 student activist's ancestors, who proceed to beat him up before setting back the clock, returning to haunt him, but also to educate him. The head of the History Department attempts to assist them in this re-education, explaining to the Vietnam War veteran / football player / honor student that he's an unwitting dupe of a communist conspiracy to undermine American society. Amidst footage of the March on the Pentagon and protests at Lafayette Park on the one hand, and film of the Berlin Wall and the Invasion of Hungary on the other, the activist learns "What's Right with America", which is said to be, quite candidly, materialist superiority. "The Commies" haven't duped the shades of the Pioneer farmer who know Ben Franklin, the Sailor who knew Fulton, and the Mechanic who knew Ford (Franklin, Fulton, Ford - one more "F" & he'd be "4F"), and they tell their variously grand & greatly grand son exactly that. They win him over, and he decides he won't let the student rioters into the library to wreak wanton destruction after all - rather, he'll go & beat the hell out of them instead, shoulder-to-shouder with his teacher & disembodied kinfolk.

YIPPIE FOR PIGASUS! (Color, 1968, 13:02)
This is the arguably the greatest and most emblematic film to come from the 1960s American counterculture - the psychedelic short by the Youth International Party (aka the "Yippies") which both documented and commented on their experience at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and their response to it by nominating for president a pig by the name of Pigasus!


The Counterculture Of The 1960s was an anti-establishment cultural phenomenon that developed throughout much of the Western world between the mid-1960s and the mid-1970s. The aggregate movement gained momentum as the US Civil Rights Movement continued to grow, and, with the expansion of the American government's extensive military intervention in Vietnam, would later become revolutionary to some. As the 1960s progressed, widespread social tensions also developed concerning other issues, and tended to flow along generational lines regarding human sexuality, women's rights, traditional modes of authority, racism, experimentation with psychoactive drugs, and differing interpretations of the American Dream. Many key movements related to these issues were born or advanced within the counterculture of the 1960s. As the era unfolded, what emerged were new cultural forms and a dynamic subculture that celebrated experimentation, modern incarnations of Bohemianism, and the rise of the hippie and other alternative lifestyles. This embrace of creativity is particularly notable in the works of musical acts such as the Beatles and Bob Dylan, as well as of New Hollywood filmmakers, whose works became far less restricted by censorship. Within and across many disciplines, many other creative artists, authors, and thinkers helped define the counterculture movement. Everyday fashion experienced a decline of the suit and especially of the wearing of hats; styles based around jeans, for both men and women, became an important fashion movement that has continued up to the present day. Several factors distinguished the counterculture of the 1960s from the anti-authoritarian movements of previous eras. The post-World War II baby boom generated an unprecedented number of potentially disaffected youth as prospective participants in a rethinking of the direction of the United States and other democratic societies. Post-war affluence allowed much of the counterculture generation to move beyond the provision of the material necessities of life that had preoccupied their Depression-era parents. The era was also notable in that a significant portion of the array of behaviors and "causes" within the larger movement were quickly assimilated within mainstream society, particularly in the US, even though counterculture participants numbered in the clear minority within their respective national populations. In general, the counterculture era commenced in earnest with the assassination of John F. Kennedy in November 1963; became absorbed into the popular culture with the termination of US combat military involvement in Southeast Asia; and ultimately concluded with the end of the draft in 1973 and the resignation of President Richard Nixon in August 1974.